The figured bass symbols for this chord in root position are 6/5/3. This step shows the E major 6th 2nd inversion on the piano, treble clef and bass clef. So the second note of the 2nd inversion - note C# is now the note with the lowest pitch for the 3rd inversion. The Solution below shows the E major 6th chord in root position, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd inversions, on the piano, treble clef and bass clef. E-5th: Since the 5th note quality of the major scale is perfect, and the note interval quality needed is perfect also, no adjustment needs to be made. The added 6th note in both cases is C#. The figured bass symbols for this chord in root position are 7/5/3, so the chord is said to be in seven-five-three position. This step shows the E major 6th 2nd inversion on the piano, treble clef and bass clef. Each chord quality name is the name of the entire chord as a whole, not its individual notes (which will be covered later). Explanation: The C major sixth is a four-note chord. Whereas a triad chord contains 3 notes, a 6th chord contains 4 notes that are played together or overlapping. The links above explain in detail the meaning of these qualities, the short abbrevations in brackets, and how to calculate the interval note names based on the scale note names from the previous step. The numbered notes are those that might be used when building this chord. Fingerings: Little finger, middle finger, index finger, thumb (left hand); thumb, index finger, middle finger, ring finger (right hand). For a quick summary of this topic, have a look at Sixth chord. The figured bass symbols for this chord in root position are 6/4/2, so the chord is said to be in six-four-two position. Looking at the table above, the note intervals for the chord quality we are interested in (major 6th), in the key of E are E-maj-3rd, E-perf-5th, and E-maj-6th. For example, the 6 represents note G#, from the B-6th interval, since the lowest (bass) note of the chord - now inverted, is B. Based on this numbering scheme, another name for this inversion would be E major 6th triad in six-four-two position. . Or put another way, the third note of the original 6th chord (in root position) is now the note with the lowest pitch. C6/A is identical with Am7. The figured bass notation for this chord in 3rd inversion is 7/5/3, with the 7 placed above the 5, and the 5 placed above the 3 on a staff diagram. If an adjustment in the pitch occurs, the note name given in the major scale in step 4 is modified, so that sharp or flat accidentals will be added or removed. This submediant chord's root / starting note is the 6th note (or scale degree) of the A major scale. The piano diagram below shows the interval short names, the note positions and the final note names of this triad chord. In a later step, if sharp or flat notes are used, the exact accidental names will be chosen. The chord is abbreviated C6. To count up a Half-tone (semitone), count up from the last note up by one physical piano key, either white or black. To build a minor sixth chord, combine the root, flat third, fifth, and sixth of the major scale. Major chords are the most common chords for the piano and other instruments. So for a 1st inversion, take the root of the 6th chord in root position from the step above - note E, and move it up one octave (12 notes) so it is the last (highest) note in the chord. This step shows the E major 6th 3rd inversion on the piano, treble clef and bass clef. The 3rd note name - G#, is used, and the chord note spelling is 3. The final chord note names and note interval links are shown in the table below. Below is a table showing the note interval qualities for the most common 6th chords, together with the interval short names / abbrevations in brackets.